All About Letterpress

The Panama City Publishing Museum in Historic St. Andrews houses a working, vintage letterpress print shop, which attracts letterpress enthusiasts from all over the world.

“Letterpress is a dying art and one that the Panama City Publishing Museum is preserving by helping promote an appreciation for this skilled art form,” said Michelle Price, Executive Director for the Historic St. Andrews Waterfront Partnership, which manages the Publishing Museum.

The museum has several functioning vintage 1915 letterpresses, which are used on a regular basis for small print jobs to help support the museum.

The Publishing Museum houses one c.1920 linotype machine, (no longer in use), and one c.1950s Heidelberg letterpress (occasionally in use), in addition to several c.1915 letterpresses, still regularly in use for small print jobs that help support the museum.

The Publishing Museum houses one c.1920 linotype machine, (no longer in use), and one c.1950s Heidelberg letterpress (occasionally in use), in addition to several c.1915 letterpresses, still regularly in use for small print jobs that help support the museum.

Letterpress: from 1439 innovation to modern day art form

Letterpress technique has changed little since Gutenberg invented the printing press in 1439. Click here for some early printing press history presented by nationally renowned letterpress artist, Amos Kennedy.  In modern times, letterpress has become more of an art form preserved by a few skilled letterpress aficionados. To learn more, watch this video about the preservation of letterpress in our modern, digital age.

The invention of Linotype:

Linotype was considered a step up from letterpress in terms of efficiency, making the production of a daily newspaper much quicker. If you‘ve ever wondered about the history of the linotype machine, click here to watch a video about the invention.

A moment of linotype history captured at the New York Times in 1978:

Check out this Fascinating Film About the Last Day of Hot Metal Typesetting at the New York Times.

Panama City Publishing Co. Museum

1134 Beck Avenue
Panama City, Florida 32401
850-872-7208

Free Admission!

Museum Hours:

Tuesday – Friday 1:00 PM to 5:30 PM

Saturday 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM